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Welcome to my Tumblr. Be nice and have fun!

littlefroggies:

thumbelina animal idea doodling I did while I took notes
chockchafer beetles are ADORABLE by the way

littlefroggies:

thumbelina animal idea doodling I did while I took notes

chockchafer beetles are ADORABLE by the way

Watercolor Materials List and Tips for Starters

valeriechua:

Hi everyone! Here’s an updated Watercolor Materials List and beginners advice for your reference. I get questions about materials almost all the time so I hope this finally answers your questions! I believe in sharing knowledge and helping others get a good start in painting so…

gobeur:

doodled my favorites (i.e. half the cast)

gobeur:

doodled my favorites (i.e. half the cast)

(via assortmint)

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture DrawingAs a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture Drawing

As a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing 
gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.

I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.

I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.

For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.

Norm

(via viria)

takethedamncash:

Alien Abduction light - UFO lamp, conceived by Lasse Klein is a unique lighting unit which is shaped like an alien soaring saucer or a UFO.

(via weirdsciencewithwonks)

slothmunster:

kingzart:

Hey guys, I’ve made some pixel brushes!! I mostly just use gray tones, but sometimes I really miss screentone-like quality when doin’ uh, comic art :D?! I have made both Photoshop and SaiTool version, so I decided to share~
Here is the link:Download PhotoshopBrushDownload SaiToolBrush+ Installing instruction
I’ll try to update if I make more screentone-like brushes or shape

HARIM IS SO PRECIOUS AND GENEROUS OK

slothmunster:

kingzart:

Hey guys, I’ve made some pixel brushes!! I mostly just use gray tones, but sometimes I really miss screentone-like quality when doin’ uh, comic art :D?! I have made both Photoshop and SaiTool version, so I decided to share~

Here is the link:
Download PhotoshopBrush
Download SaiToolBrush+ Installing instruction

I’ll try to update if I make more screentone-like brushes or shape

HARIM IS SO PRECIOUS AND GENEROUS OK

(via assortmint)

Frozen Characters Designs by Jim Kin (x)

(Source: mickeyandcompany, via viria)

engelen:

Here’s a little walk-through of my drawing process.

This method, I’ve found, is kind of similar to working on real paper, in that you make a light under-sketch, and then define, and erase lines as you go along. Drawing is re-drawing, and this method helps me pull-through when I think I should be making awesome shit on my first attempt, when in fact what you should be doing is just polish, and work on a thing until it stops looking like you have never seen a thing.  

Some students have asked me why I don’t just do my clean-up on a separate layer. I mean, I guess you could do that, but for some odd reason, I feel like my clean-ups are more successful when I draw right on top of my sketch layer.


Sidney Poitier visiting Tony Curtis & Jack Lemmon on the set of Some Like it Hot (1959)

Sidney Poitier visiting Tony Curtis & Jack Lemmon on the set of Some Like it Hot (1959)

(Source: januarybryant, via assortmint)